A change of direction

Six weeks ago I was elected onto the new Dorset Council. One of the few downsides to this is that since then, in fact since the start of the election campaign several weeks prior to this, I’ve been struggling to find the time for many of my other projects – projects that are important to me personally, projects that keep my philosophical flame burning. This is requiring me to rethink how I handle these projects. The Philosophy in Pubs group I run is fairly straight forward, does not require a significant amount of time, so is at no risk whatsoever. The research that I have been doing into a narrative approach to ethics is important to me, not least because I think it important politically, but the book that was planned as an outcome will need to be put on hold. But on a positive note, I’m pleased to say that last Friday was a landmark day, in as much as I actually found the time to pick up the reading I was doing before local politics drowned all other activity.

Which brings me to this blog. My plan so far has been to write and post an essay of between 800 and a 1000 words every two weeks, an essay offering a philosophical reflection on some event or news item. But the reflection requires time, or at least some mental space where connections between disparate ideas can can tried, re-worked and finally sculptured into a coherent argument. Once this has happened, for me at least, the writing is fairly straight-forward. No, this approach requires some uncluttered thinking time – time I just haven’t got at the moment. However, I really do not want to stop writing. I enjoy writing. So I’m going to try a different approach. Instead of a reasonably substantial piece on a single subject every two weeks, I going to try a short piece (500 words at the most) every week simply reflecting on the week that has just past. A philosophical diary if you like. Hopefully I can do this by simply sitting down for a couple of hours at the weekend and writing what comes into my head. We’ll see.

For example, the topic that has dominated my thinking this last couple of weeks has been the drafting of a climate emergency motion for submission to the full Dorset Council. At the first meeting of this Council last month, due to pressure from members of Extinction Rebellion in the public area, a climate emergency was declared – but the motion passed was so bland that it makes no commitment to action at all. This needs to change. The Council at least needs to commit to developing certain strategies and policies. But in doing so many elected members will be fearful of either the consequences of certain lines of action, or will be hesitant because of having no idea how certain strategies will, or could be implemented. This must not stop us stating clearly what needs to happen. If we wait until we know the how of our response to the climate and ecological breakdown we face we will never act. We must let the necessity to act become the mother of invention. And if certain actions have outcomes we would prefer not to happen, then so be it. That is often the consequence of an emergency.

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